Occupational Health Nursing Guidelines for Primary Clinical Conditions, Fourth Edition

Bonnie Rogers, DrPH, COHN-S, LNCC, FAAN
Susan A. Randolph, MSN, RN, COHN-S, FAAOHN
Karen Mastroianni, MPH, BSN, COHN-S, FAAOHN

Price: $95.00 $47.50
This highly anticipated new edition continues to provide you with comprehensive and detailed guidance on the assessment, management, and referral of work-related and non-occupational health issues as well as the development of workplace health programs.

Comprehensive and up to date – an indispensable resource for occupational health nursing practitioners, consultants, and managers.

"> Buy E-Book

SOLD OUT - A NEW, FIFTH EDITION, IS SCHEDULED FOR RELEASE IN AUGUST - SEE ITEM 23114!
Provides comprehensive and detailed guidance on the assessment, management, and referral of work-related and non-occupational health issues as well as the development of workplace health programs.

Comprehensive and up to date – an indispensable resource for occupational health nursing practitioners, consultants, and managers.

Sample Page 1 Quick Links Click the links below to connect to the following:
View the Table of Contents
Read the Preface to the Fourth Edition
About the Authors

Sample Page 2 Occupational Health Nursing Guidelines for Primary Clinical Conditions, Fourth Edition is ready to assist you! This highly anticipated new edition continues to provide you with comprehensive and detailed guidance on the assessment, management, and referral of work-related and non-occupational health issues as well as the development of workplace health programs.

Divided into three sections, – Prevention and Screening, Primary Care, and Emergency Care – each of the more than 115 guidelines provides the definition, characteristics, objectives for care and outcomes, modes of treatment, necessity for referral, and an emphasis on follow-up. All guidelines have been reviewed and updated by an expert panel of occupational health nurses and physicians to provide a current and clear understanding of the clinical characteristics or treatment measures involved. Also included is a handy checklist for physician approval of the guidelines as Standing Orders.

Sample Page 3 The book has several sections related to the practice of occupational health nursing including Special Programs areas such as health surveillance, case management, respiratory protection, hearing conservation, disaster management, and much more.

The Occupational Health Resources Aids section assists the occupational health nurse in the delivery of occupational health services by providing forms for history taking and record keeping. Especially useful is a table of common prescriptive and non-prescriptive medications used in the occupational health setting with standing orders.

A final section of Appendices includes a list of reference resources, community resources, State Boards of Nursing, NIOSH Education and Research Centers, acronyms, and a glossary.

Long considered an important guide for clinical and programmatic areas in occupational health nursing practice, this new edition will provide a basis for actions that allow for, or rather demand, an individualized plan of care. The use of standardized clinical guidelines for nursing practice can help in the following ways:

• To provide for goal-oriented outcomes
• To guide the sytematic collection of data
• To enhance critical thinking and clinical management skills
• To maximize clinical decision-making
• To improve the quality and consistency of nursing care
• To guide the development of evaluative criteria
• To foster professional accountability
Table of Contents
    Preface v Acknowledgments vii A Request to our Colleagues viii Telephone Numbers and Information ix Review and Approval for Care Directed Guideline xvii I Prevention and Screening 1
  1. Adult Health Maintenance 3
    1. Adult Health Maintenance Guidelines 4
  2. Adult Immunizations 5
    1. Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule 6
    2. Recommended Adult Vaccines 7
  3. Breast Cancer Detection 9
    1. Breast Cancer Detection Guidelines 10
    2. Breast Self-Examination (BSE) 11
  4. Cervical Cancer Detection and Pap Test 12
    1. Cervical Cancer Detection Guideline 13
  5. Drug Testing 14
  6. Glaucoma Screening 16
    1. Comprehensive Eye Examination 18
  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus 19
    1. Universal Precautions 21
  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 23
  9. Hypercholesterolemia Screening and Monitoring 24
    1. Hypercholesterolemia Classification 26
    2. LDL Cholesterol Goals, Cutpoints for Therapeutic Lifestyle Change and Treatment 27
    3. CHD Risk Factors 27
  10. Hypertension Screening and Monitoring 28
    1. Blood Pressure Classification and Follow-up in Adults 30
    2. Risk Stratification and Treatment 30
  11. Pregnancy and Prenatal Health 31
    1. Pregnancy Risk Factors and Warning Signs 32
  12. Prostate Diseases and Detection 33
  13. Skin Cancer Detection 35
    1. Comparison of Skin Cancer with Actinic Keratosis 37
  14. Testicular Cancer Detection 38
    1. Testicular Self-Examination (TSE) 39
  15. Tetanus Prophylaxis 40
    1. Recommended Tetanus Prophylaxis 41
  16. Tuberculosis Screening and Monitoring 42
  17. Vibration Syndrome 44
  18. II. Primary Care 47
  19. Acne 49
  20. Allergic Reaction 50
    1. Examples of Identification Tags for Allergic Reaction 52
  21. Allergic Rhinitis or Hay Fever 53
  22. Allergy Injections 55
  23. Backache: Chronic Low Back Strain and Pain 57
  24. Blister 59
  25. Bronchitis 60
  26. Canker Sore 61
  27. Chlamydia 62
  28. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) 64
  29. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 67
  30. Conjunctivitis 69
  31. Corn or Callus 70
  32. Depression 72
  33. Dermatitis 74
    1. Primary and Secondary Skin Lesions 75
  34. Dysmenorrhea/Premenstrual Syndrome 76
  35. Ear Wax (Cerumen) 78
  36. Earache: Otitis Externa 79
  37. Earache: Otitis Media 80
  38. Eczema 82
  39. Fibromyalgia 83
  40. Gastrointestinal Disturbance: Constipation
  41. Gastrointestinal Disturbance: Diarrhea
  42. Genital Warts 89
  43. Gonorrhea 90
  44. Grief 92
  45. Headache 94
  46. Headache, Migraine 96
    1. Comparison of Headache Types 98
    2. Sample Guide for a Headache Diary 98
  47. Hepatitis A 99
    1. Vaccine Prevention Guidelines for Hepatitis A 101
    2. Recommended Vaccination Schedule 101
  48. Hepatitis B 102
    1. Recommended Vaccination Schedule 103
  49. Hepatitis C 104
    1. Comparison of Hepatitis Types A, B, and C 106
  50. Hernia 107
  51. Herpes Simplex Type 1 (HSV-1) (Oral) 109
  52. Herpes Simplex Type 2 (HSV-2) (Genital) 110
  53. Influenza 111
  54. Lyme Disease 111
    1. Medically Recommended Treatment of Early Localized Lyme Disease 114
  55. Melanoma 115
    1. Risk Factors for Melanoma 117
    2. Comparing Melanoma Types 118
  56. Menopause 119
  57. Musculoskeletal Disorder 121
  58. Osteoperosis 122
  59. Pharyngitis 124
  60. Plantar Warts 125
  61. Psoriasis 126
  62. Psychological Impairment 127
  63. Shingles (Herpes Zoster) 128
  64. Sinusitis 130
  65. Sleep Disorders: Insomnia/Sleep Apnea 132
  66. Splinter 134
  67. Stress 135
    1. Factors Contributing to the Stress Response 137
  68. Stye (Hordeolum) 138
  69. Sunburn 139
    1. Drugs That Can Cause Photosensitivity 141
  70. Syphillis 142
  71. Tendinitis 144
  72. Thyroid Disorders: Hyperthyroidism 146
  73. Thyroid Disorders: Hypothyroidism 148
  74. Toothache: Pulpitis 149
    1. Treatment for Toothache 150
  75. Upper Respiratory Infection (Common Cold) 151
  76. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) 152
  77. Urticaria (Hives) 153
  78. Vertigo 155
  79. Violence in the Workplace 156
  80. III. Emergency Care 159
  81. Abdominal Trauma 161
  82. Abrasion, Laceration, or Puncture 163
  83. Airway Obstruction 165
    1. The Heimlich Maneuver for Choking 167
  84. Amputation 168
  85. Anaphylactic Shock 169
  86. Angina Pectoris and Cardiac Chest Pain 170
    1. Cardiac Risk Factors 172
    2. Metabolic or Insulin-Resistance Syndrome 172
  87. Asthmatic Reaction 173
  88. Bite Wounds 175
  89. Burn: Chemical 177
  90. Burn: Electrical 179
  91. Burn: Thermal 180
    1. Burn: Rule of Nines 182
  92. Cardiopulmonary Arrest 183
  93. Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA) 186
  94. Contusion 167
  95. Convulsion or Seizure 188
  96. Diabetic Emergency: Hyperglycemia 189
    1. Blood Glucose Levels 191
    2. Risk Factors for Diabetes 191
  97. Diabetic Emergency: Hypoglycemia 192
  98. Epistaxis 194
  99. Eye Injury: Chemical Burn 195
  100. Eye Injury: Contusion (Blunt Trauma) 197
  101. Eye Injury: Flash Burn (Welding) 198
  102. Eye Injury: Flash Burn (Nonwelding) 199
  103. Eye Injury: Foreign Body or Corneal Abrasion 200
  104. Eye Injury: Laceration of Eyelid 201
  105. Eye Injury: Penetrating or Intraocular Foreign Body 202
  106. Eye Injury: Protruding Foreign Body 203
  107. Fracture: Closed 204
  108. Fracture: Open 206
  109. Frostbite 208
  110. Head Injury 210
  111. Heat Stress 212
    1. Heat-Related Stress 213
    2. Heat Index Chart 213
    3. Permissible Heat Exposure Threshold Limit Values 214
    4. Heat Stress card 215
  112. Heat Disorder: Heat Cramps 216
  113. Heat Disorder: Heat Exhaustion–Salt-Depletion Type 217
  114. Heat Disorder: Heat Stroke 218
    1. Comparison of Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke 219
  115. Hypothermia 220
  116. Insect Sting 222
  117. Pneumothorax 224
  118. Shock 226
  119. Sprain: Acute 228
  120. IV. Special Programs 229
  121. Adult International Travel 231
  122. Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) 233
  123. Automated External Defibrillation (AED) Flowchart 235
  124. Case Management 236
  125. Disaster Management 238
  126. Ergonomic Assessment 242
  127. Exercise 244
  128. Genetic Screening and Monitoring 248
  129. Health and Safety Committees 250
  130. Health Promotion 252
  131. Health Surveillance 257
  132. Substances Requiring Medical Surveillance by OSHA Standards 259
  133. Hearing Conservation 260
  134. Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) 263
  135. Major Indoor Air Contaminants 265
  136. Laser Safety Programs 267
  137. Medical Waste Disposal 269
  138. Nutrition 271
  139. Sample USDA Food Guide and the DASH Eating Plan at the 2,000 Calorie Level 276
  140. Over-the-Counter Medications 277
  141. Poisoning 279
  142. Certified Regional Poison Control Centers 280
  143. Quality Assurance: Clinical 286
  144. Respiratory Protection 288
  145. Safety Audits 290
  146. Shift Work 293
  147. Smoking Cessation 295
  148. Overview of Smoking Cessation Aids 287
  149. Smoking Cessation Resources 300
  150. Violence Prevention 301
  151. V. Occupational Health Resource Aids 305
  152. Common Prescriptive and Nonprescriptive Medications Used in the Occupational Health Setting with Standing Orders 307
  153. Confidentiality of Health and Medical Records 315
  154. Occupational and Environmental Health History 317
    1. Occupational and Environmental Health History Form 318
  155. Physical Health Assessment 322
    1. Physical Assessment Examination 323
  156. Precepting in the Occupational Health Setting 327
    1. Precepting Sample Objectives 329
  157. Reproductive Health History 331
    1. Reproductive Health History Questionnaire 333
    2. Resources for Reproductive Hazard Information 338
  158. SOAP Charting 339
    1. SOAP Protocol Example 340
  159. Worksite Assessment 342
    1. Worksite Assessment Guide343
  1. Occupational Health Nursing Reference Library 355
    1. Books 355
    2. Journals and Periodicals 362
    3. Resource Websites 370
  2. Community Resources
    1. Occupational Health and Safety Agencies 371
    2. OSHA Regional Offices 373
    3. Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Groups 374
    4. Professional and Volunteer Organizations 375
    5. Catalogs and Directories 378
  3. State Boards of Nursing 379
    1. Nurse Licensure Compact 384
  4. NIOSH Education and Research Centers 385
  5. Acronyms 387
  6. Glossary 389
  7. References 395 Index 403
Publication Date 2009
Format Spiralbound, 409 pages
ISBN 978-1-883595-52-4
Product Code 23098
Preface to Fourth Edition he occupational health nurse's practice continues to expand with a focus not only on protection from work-related injury and disease, but also the provision of professional nursing care for the management of occupational and nonoccupational clinical conditions and health promotion activities that have become integral to the nursing role in the work setting. This trend has created a need for practice guidelines to help delineate parameters of care. Occupational Health Nursing Guidelines for Primary Clinical Conditions, Fourth Edition, is expanded and revised. The number of guidelines presented continue to grow based on needs identified from practitioners in the field, tripling those in the first edition. Guidelines have been categorized in three different areas: Prevention and Screening, Primary Care, and Emergency Care. Each guideline follows the same format: problem definition, clinical and related characteristics, and policy perspectives; clinical objectives, assessment criteria and nursing interventions; specific conditions requiring medical referral; and follow-up activities. Each clinical guide has been reviewed by nursing and medical experts, and some have been supplemented with summary or comparison tables and illustrations for a clearer understanding of the clinical characteristics or treatment measures involved. In addition, the manual has several sections related to the practice including special program areas important to occupational health nursing (e.g., surveillance, case management, respiratory protection), a resource aid section to assist the occupational health nurse in the delivery of occupational health services, and an appendices section with important and useful information. This book is considered a guide for clinical and programmatic areas in occupational health nursing practice, and each guideline should be treated as such. The guidelines presume that when any employee enters the occupational health setting, the occupational health nurse obtains an appropriate health and occupational history and conducts examinations relevant to the presenting problem and history within the limits of the applicable State Nurse Practice Act. These guidelines are written to provide a basis for such actions while allowing for, or rather demanding, an individualized plan of care. For many common health problems seen in the occupational health unit, independent nursing interventions are appropriate. However, because of the interdependent nature of nursing and medicine, collaborative strategies often are appropriate, requiring physician referral or intervention. Though each of the guidelines in this book notes specific conditions warranting referral, every situation is different, and professional judgment must guide the occupational health nurse in making referrals to other health care professionals. In addition, it is important to recognize that the occupational health nurse or other occupational health care provider does not constitute a replacement for the employee's primary health care provider; referrals and collaboration with the employee's primary health care provider are an essential component of the employee's overall health care. We believe that clinical nursing and programmatic guidelines used within a model of collaborative practice in occupational settings can help foster and clarify communication between occupational health nurses, physicians, and other health care providers with respect to appropriate and consistent procedures and parameters for clinical management and referral. In addition, the use of standardized clinical guidelines for nursing practice can help in the following ways: • To provide for goal-directed outcomes • To guide the systematic collection of data • To enhance critical thinking and clinical management skills • To maximize clinical decision-making • To improve the quality and consistency of nursing care • To guide the development of evaluative criteria • To foster professional accountability It is of paramount importance that the health care provider appropriately maintain confidentiality of employee health information. Information required by law and relevant to work-related illness and injury should be disclosed only within the parameters of ethical codes, maintaining employee autonomy, and informed consent. We hope that these guidelines will become a valuable resource for the professional registered nurse practicing in an occupational health setting. We encourage our readers, however, to make use of the many resources available to the occupational health nurse from both public and private sources. To that end, we have included appendices consisting of a variety of sources of information on the practice of occupational health nursing and on specific clinical conditions. Appendix A offers a categorical list of books and journals in the Occupational Health Nursing Reference Library. In Appendix B are Community Resources, including a list of training videos, catalogs, agencies, and organizations concerned with the advancement of health in the work setting. A directory of the State Boards of Nursing can be found in Appendix C, and in Appendix D are listed the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Research Centers. Appendix E presents commonly used acronyms and Appendix F is a glossary of commonly used terms. We encourage our readers to make use of these and other valuable resources in their daily practice and to continually search for new scientifically-based information that will support and improve occupational health nursing practice. Bonnie Rogers About the Authors Bonnie Rogers, DrPH, COHN-S, LNCC, FAAN Professor and Director, North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Education and Research Center and the Occupational Health Nursing Program University of North Carolina School of Public Health Chapel Hill, North Carolina Susan A. Randolph, MSN, RN, COHN-S, FAAOHN Clinical Assistant Professor Occupational Health Nursing Program University of North Carolina School of Public Health Chapel Hill, North Carolina Karen Mastroianni, MPH, BSN, COHN-S, FAAOHN Principal, Health & Safety Strategist Dimensions in Occupational Health & Safety, Inc. Raleigh, North Carolina
Price: $95.00 $47.50
This highly anticipated new edition continues to provide you with comprehensive and detailed guidance on the assessment, management, and referral of work-related and non-occupational health issues as well as the development of workplace health programs.

Comprehensive and up to date – an indispensable resource for occupational health nursing practitioners, consultants, and managers.

"> Buy E-Book
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